The French Bulldog

Bred primarily as companion dogs, Frenchies crave all the love and affection we humans have to offer. They’re just as satisfied playing with kids and other dogs as they are being a couch potato. Goofy, yet intelligent, French bulldogs make an easygoing best friend for any dog lover.

If your idea of the perfect pet is a pint-sized comedian with a special gift for napping, meet the French bulldog. These charming pups love to play just as much as they love to snuggle up on their owner’s lap to take a snooze. They won’t get taller than 13 inches at the shoulder, making them a great option for city dwellers. It doesn’t take much space to keep a Frenchie happy. This breed has an easygoing personality and they make wonderful companions for families, children, or seniors. They’re easy to groom and easy to please, and they thrive on human contact.






French bulldogs are often described as “chilled out,” but they also love to play. They do well with companion pets, so long as they have been socialized properly. Training comes easy to this breed when there’s food involved. As free thinkers and fun lovers, they’ll be more eager to learn if training feels like a game.


Frenchies do have a bit of a mischievous side, so they’ll need an owner who can laugh along with them while also sticking firm to their training plan. Becky Smith, president of the French Bull Dog Club of America (FBDCA) notes that people with “patience, a kind disposition, gentle hands, and a loving spirit are the ideal owner for this darling breed,” who thrive on human interaction. Frenchies just want to give love (and get lots of belly rubs in return!)


While Frenchies do enjoy playing, they’re just as happy to sit at your feet while you work or curl up on your lap to snooze. “[If you are] the owner of a Frenchie—or shall I say if you are owned by a Frenchie—don't expect an outdoor dog that can go jogging and then go to the beach on a hot sunny day,” Smith says. “They do not do well in extreme heat because of their flat face. … They are not great swimmers due to their body weight versus length of leg.”


The AKC says the French bulldog’s “front-heavy structure” is to blame for their inability to swim, and suggests never leaving one unattended near water. French bulldogs are also more prone to heat exhaustion, so a 15-minute walk or play session in the cooler evenings will give them plenty of physical activity. They’re wonderful apartment dogs, because they don’t need a large yard or a lot of space to be happy.

Alice's Verified French Bulldog Puppies For Sale

We will not sell our puppies without some background information and we ask that you do not buy them as a gift for someone else unless that person has requested a puppy and you a sure the person will take good care of our lovely baby.


Aimee - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Female

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Ben - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Male

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Dan - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Male

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Joy - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Female

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Lucy - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Female

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Max - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Male

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Mimi - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Female

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Molly - $750


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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Female

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Poo - $750


AVAILABLE

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Breed - French Bulldog Puppy

Sex - Male

Age - 12 weeks

Registered : Yes(AKC)

Vet-Checked : Yes

Good with children : Yes

Care

Weekly brushing should ensure that any Frenchie’s coat stays handsome and healthy. They’ll require a bath about once a month, giving extra attention to their hallmark wrinkles to make sure they don’t get infected. Owners also need to regularly check their bulldog’s skin for lesions or scabs and see a vet right away should anything seem out of the ordinary.

Like many breeds, a French bulldog needs to learn how to socialize from a young age. They can be very protective and possessive of their humans. So long as they are socialized as puppies, Frenchies get along great with new faces and other dogs or cats.

If a little drool on the furniture bothers you, a Frenchie might not be the breed for you. They can also be difficult to potty train. They are intelligent, yet free spirited, so they may dig in their heels when it comes to appeasing commands. Training a Frenchie will take a little patience and a lot of treats, but they respond well to positive reinforcement and praise for good behavior. Just stick with it and your little guy will come around.

History

Contrary to their name, the French bulldog’s story doesn’t begin in France—it originates in England. In Nottingham, lace makers kept toy-size bulldogs to chase away rats in their small working quarters. During the height of the Industrial Revolution in the 1800s, lace workers were replaced by machines, so many were forced to relocate to France, where lace was still made by hand. The French fell in love with the smaller bulldog that came along with the workers, and after decades of crossbreeding, the breed developed their iconic bat ears and the French bulldog was born. Parisians took a great liking to the breed, and soon every artist, actor, and celebrity in the city wanted one. Americans visiting overseas loved the miniature version of the bulldog, and it wasn’t long before Frenchies took off in the U.S. as well.

In the early days of the breed, there were two types of ears on Frenchies: the bat style popular with Americans and the rose ear commonly seen on their kin the bulldog. This ear difference was the source of great controversy amongst breed aficionados. Americans insisted that true Frenchies had to have the bat ears we know the breed for today; British and French breed lovers disagreed. Things came to a head at the 1897 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in February when rose ear Frenchies were given top scores by non-American judges. A group of prominent French bulldog fans founded the French Bulldog Club of America in April 1897 to establish and document the breed standard and demanded the bat ear become the breed standard. They eventually won.